Hanahau'oli Assembly Brings GREAT JOY!

During this holiday season and time for celebration, we all reflect upon things that we wish for. 

Mrs. G-W led a beautiful assembly about great wishes and joys.  She posed to our students, “What do you wish for?”  Hands quickly raised -- “A pet unicorn!”  “I wish snow could be everywhere!” “Headphones!” A car with a castle on top!” “No homework!”  “I want people to stop fighting.”  “I wish for wars to stop.”

Following the sharing by the children, Mrs. G-W read a story entitled Great Joy by Kate DiCamillo. This story inspires students to think even more about wishes.

We learn about Frances, a little girl from New York.  She will be in a holiday pageant at her church and she needs to learn her line in the play. However, her attention is elsewhere. She looks down from her window and sees an organ grinder with his monkey holding a tin cup.  The organ grinder sings songs but they sound sad and far away.

“Where do they go at night?” Frances ponders this and asks her mother.   Frances finds out that they sleep in the street, even when it snows. 

On the morning of the pageant, Frances puts a nickel in the cup and invites the organ grinder with his monkey to her church and to the pageant. 

It was time for the pageant! Frances has her opportunity to say her line but she remained silent. She was so concerned about the organ grinder and the monkey.  Suddenly, the church doors open and the organ grinder and the monkey appeared.  What GREAT JOY!

We wish all our families these special moments sharing kindness, compassion, aloha, and  GREAT JOY!  Happy holidays to all! 

HANAHAU 'OLI HOLIDAY BAND CONCERT

DECEMBER 8, 2017

Joyful Jazzy Jingles by Hanahau'oli's Beginning Band, Concert Band and Wind Ensemble were a treat at our last Friday's Assembly!

Performers from all 3 bands, led by Band Teacher, Ernie Provencher, played beautifully and delighted the audience inspiring the holiday spirit!

Beginning Band . . .  Hot Cross Buns was really hot!  First Flight really took off!  Rolling Along sure did sound like Mary Had a Little Lamb with a wonderful winter holiday spin!

Concert Band . . . your music was lively in Old MacDonald had a Band! Frères Jacques, dormez-vous?  Absolutely not!  Everyone was wide awake listening to your great sounds . . . and the tunes, When the Saints Go Marching In followed by Hard Rock Blues were swinging supported by those steady beats of the percussion players!  The audience was amazed by the beautiful flute solo of Brielle Rousseau playing Aura Lee!

Wind Ensemble . . . the musicianship of the student musicians in performing All Through the Night, Scarborough Fair, Incantation and Ritual and the Holiday Medley were clearly evident. This repertoire was fun and full of musical delights!  And what about that special saxophone player, Mr. Hirokawa joining the wind ensemble!

As Mrs. G-W said, the two best holiday concerts took place right here on campus!  How lucky we all were to hear the children play and be INSTRUMENTAL in creating such wonderful holiday spirit!

Thanks to both Mr. Uehara and Mr. Provencher for their work with the students!

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli Holiday Orchestra Concert

 

This morning, the pavilion was filled with the merriment of Christmas music!

Our Beginning Orchestra began with "Mary's Adventures" - three versions of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" followed by "Jingle Bells." A member of the Intermediate Orchestra, Ashlyn Ito, performed a cello solo playing Henry Purcell's "Rigadoon." The Intermediate Orchestra entertained with "Old Uyehara Had a Farm," naming then playing each instrument in a fun version of "Old McDonald Had a Farm." They then played "Up on the Housetop," "Can Can," and Beethoven's "Ode to Joy." The festively attired Advanced Orchestra treated listeners to a variety of pieces beginning with "La Petite Danseuse," "Rest Ye Merry, Rock Ye Very," an energized rendition of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen", and with the help of guest drummer, Mr. Harold Chang, they brought down the house with "Jingle Rock: Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas and Jingle Bell Rock" featuring Mie Kodama, Emi Okumoto, and Ashly Winkler. Thank you to Ms. Megumi Kurachi for accompanying many songs on the piano and Mr. Chad Uyehara for leading the students to another great Holiday Concert! 

Happy Holidays!!!

Hanahau'oli's 2017 Makahiki Celebration

Makahiki at Hanahau'oli is always a joyous occasion and this year was one of the best! Students from all classes performed wonderful mele (songs), hula (dances), and Hawaiian games and we even donated over 250 cans of food as ho'okupu (offerings) to a local shelter in honor of the event.

The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The class of 2018 poses for a group picture moments before the start of Makahiki proudly wearing their kapa.

The blowing of the "pū", or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the "kapu" system. This festival honored the god Lono, who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

The blowing of the "pū", or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the "kapu" system.

This festival honored the god Lono, who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang “E Ala E.” The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “Pua Ke Ko.” This song told us about the relationship between the "ko", or sugarcane, and the "he’ʻe", octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang “E Ala E.” The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “Pua Ke Ko.” This song told us about the relationship between the "ko", or sugarcane, and the "he’ʻe", octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

Ancient Hawaiʻians enjoyed participating in sports that tested their strength, skill and endurance. Although war was forbidden during Makahiki, many of these sports allowed the young men and women to display their skills. The 6th Graders enjoyed showing us how these many games are played!

Makahiki continues to be one of our most cherished traditions. This year, seven 6th Grade parent alumni shared their fondest memories of their Makahiki experiences with Mrs. G-W and the crowd in honor of our 99th birthday as a school! 

Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.

Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.

 

 

HANAHAU'OLI'S FRIDAY KAPA-MAKING ASSEMBLY!

The School’s Valued Tradition of Kapa-making for Makahiki

The Po‘e Ka‘ahele class enchanted us with their joy and excitement of making their kapa for Makahiki.  The Po‘e students enlightened us on the entire process, starting with the wauke plant, scraping the bark and pounding the slice of bark with a kapa beater to spread out the fibers making and preparing a fabric ready for printing. 

We learned about the ‘ohe kāpala.  These are stamps (originally made with bamboo) carved with primarily geometric shapes used to print the repetitive patterns onto their kapa.  The children said the stamp design was personally meaningful and symbolic to each of them. They taught us how they needed to consider the importance of  both positive and negative space in designing their kapa.

Our students used carved into linoleum glued to wood to make their ‘ohe kāpala.  Each student shared their particular designs, and informed us that originally Native Hawaiians were able to use natural dyes were extracted from every part a plant. Some students chose fish hook, mountains, sunset, erupting volcanoes, waves, land, sky, ocean for their designs. 

We also learned how the boys correctly tie and wear the kapa!

Hurry hurry and please stop by the Art Gallery and view for yourself the beauty and the craftsmanship of the Po‘e students’ kapa! The Po‘e students will proudly wear their kapa at Makahiki on Wednesday, 11/22/17!

A special mahalo to Mrs. Okano for her help with making the kapa!

Happy Thanksgiving to all! 

Hanahau'oli's Halloween Friday Assembly

Po'e Ka'ahele proudly presents "Harry Porter and the Missing Child!"

Lights! Camera! Action!  Hermione, Ron and Harry are at a party when suddenly . . . everything changes and they are on an adventure.  Will they ever get home?

"Expelliarmus!" Everyone is transported to the magical world of a foggy graveyard filled with infamous souls, zombies, mummies, Mr. Skullington, a mystical forest with lumberjacks, creepy spider sisters, Mama Bear and her 3 cubs, Sherlock and Jaspar Bones, Mutant Owl, Unicorns, rats, cats, the Fluffies with their Tamer and his violin, and, of course, Voldemort who reveals to be Ron's actual mother (hmmm . . . we wonder who played this character?).

At the flick of Hermione's wand, characters Harry, Hermione, and Ron find themselves surrounded in mystical surroundings -- and Ron is whisked away by Zombido and Zombida! Hermione and Harry were determined to find their friend, no matter what it takes!

The PHANTASTIC PLAY was spooky, fun, punctuated with Halloween jokes, singing, rap, and dancing!  

Congratulations to the Po'e class and Po'e teachers, especially Director, Mrs. Porter with the support of Assistant Director, Kamalei.  This was Mrs. Porter's first experience with the Halloween Assembly and she and the entire class did a spooktacular job.  It was acted by the class of 2020 and produced by the class of 2019!  Great job Po'e class, Po'e team teachers, Mrs. Armstrong and Ms. Eldredge, to all the students who were the writers and provided the tech support and program support!  

Happy Halloween to all, our joyful school's special time of year!  Here's to the "orange and . . . black!" . . . at least for now!  Who did the ghost invite to the party?  Anyone he could dig up!  Ha!

 

Hanahau 'oli's Friday Assembly "Makahiki Gear Up" with Uncle Blair on October 20, 2017

 

Uncle Blair led a spirited Assembly to “gear up” for Makahiki on November 22, 2017.

He hale lama no Hanahau‘oli
Feeling good with friends at Hanahau‘oli
We welcomed a few 7th graders from Iolani School who joined us at Assembly.  It was great to see them again!  They returned to talk to the 6th graders about 7th grade at Iolani School!

The JK class started the morning with a review of the Hawaiian alphabet with vowels and consonants and singing the Hawaiian Alphabet song!

Ku‘ikahi homegroup Kukunaokalā shared E Ala E “Arise” and waking up the sun!

E ala e, ka lā i ka hikina,
Awaken/Arise, the sun in the east,
I ka moana, ka moana hohonu,
From the ocean, the deep ocean,
Pi‘i ka lewa, ka lewa nu‘u,
Climbing to heaven, the highest heaven,
I ka hikina, aia ka lā, e ala e!
In the east, there is the sun, arise!

Ka‘imi Loa shared a chant that described how the Hawaiians were so attuned and observant of their surroundings, both on land and in the sea.  For example, the chant tells about when the squid comes in, when the breadfruit is ripe, and how the sea urchins move.

The 6th grade class led the ‘oli Lamalama Kū with response, Ki‘e ki‘e no keia that was written by Uncle Blair.  The pane or response closes the chant with:

Kū ka hale lama o Hanahau'oli
 Healing place, place of learning
 Nobody can take away what you learn

 

2017 Children's Fair Logo: Student-Designed!

Returning to our school “roots” guides the Hui’s work this year, especially as we prepare for our Centennial.  Since the Fair’s beginnings in 1924, children play a special part in shaping the fair experience.  From designing signage to creating crafts to performing on stage to running games, the involvement is rich and meaningful. 

Committed to “learning by doing” and striving to seize opportunities for students to engage in authentic work, Mrs. Okano and Mrs. Woo asked the sixth grade students if they would be interested in designing the logo for this year’s Children’s Fair.  Nine students eagerly and enthusiastically embraced the challenge, dedicating several recess times to this important work.

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At each step of the process, Mrs. Okano and Mrs. Woo were amazed and inspired by the students’ creativity in expression as well as their deep understandings of our school’s core beliefs.  

The Fair’s theme, “Hanahau’oli School, Rooted in Our Hearts,” was presented to the students.  After thinking about the purpose of logos (as symbols) and studying common, powerful logos, the students individually brainstormed ideas to visually represent the theme.  Each student then presented their concept to the group.  A wonderful exchange of ideas and building upon ideas ensued, leading to the final concept:  a series of “growing” hands (JK - 6th grade) to represent our “hands-on” approach to learning, connected together by the mock orange branch woven throughout, ending with the sixth grade hand print over the heart.  The heart in the middle of the sixth grade palm holds “99,” celebrating our ninety-ninth year!  The flower blossom near the sixth grade hand symbolizes the idea of being in “full bloom” in the final year at Hanahau’oli.  All conceptualized by these nine students!      

Next up - execution of the design!  Several students facilitated the process of getting orange handprints from JK - 6th grade students, and selecting just the right print.  Sketching from our actual mock orange, one student drew the connecting branch and flower in bloom.  Another student practiced calligraphy to write the theme, and two students drew the “99” in the heart.

Testing the hand print process...

Testing the hand print process...

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All the pieces, ready to be integrated into a logo!

All the pieces, ready to be integrated into a logo!

Thanks to Mr. Miyamoto’s computer graphic design skills, the students were able to see the complete logo in various color combinations.  Utilizing what they know about colors, the students chose the final colors.  And, voila!  A student-created logo blooms!  

"Hands-on" voting of our favorite color combination

"Hands-on" voting of our favorite color combination

Seeing several of the students tell about their logo at the Hui General Membership Meeting captured the essence of this experience - children using their creativity to express their appreciation of and love for our school.  The final glorious moment is yet to come... Fair day, November 4th, when most of our community will be adorning their design!       

The final design!

The final design!

Hanahau'oli's Friday the 13th Assembly!

No such thing as bad luck on this day!  We were SO LUCKY to have had some great announcements from the Kare Kids and the Fair, and our 6th grade class enthralled us with their silhouettes!

The Kare Kids shared all the wonderful community service projects they are supporting this school year.  They include helping:

·      Waianae Canine Kokua to help homeless owners of dogs;

·      UNICEF at trick-or-treat to help people get clean water, purchase mosquito nets, and aid refugee children learn and heal;

·      Smile Train to bring smiles to children’s lives with cleft palates so please buy children-made crafts at the Fair to support this effort;

·      Hale Nani to support the elderly.  Kare Kids share their talents on site by telling jokes, doing magic, playing an instrument or doing art activities or crafts with them;

The Kare Kids truly care!  What unbelievable community support and service learning!. . . and unbelievable is the word for the wonderful handmade things that will be sold at the Children’s Fair to support Kare Kids’ projects!  Come get rubber band bracelets, charms, stickers, washi tapes, hand-painted rocks!  The Po‘e classroom is the place to be to support Kare Kids at the Fair!!  See you there!!

This year’s fair is focused on having the children drive many components of the fair!  We got to see hand sewn pillows that will be sold.  There will be a fun photo booth and we hope students and alumni will try out the new Sound Booth in the Art Gallery to share stories and memories!  This Fair will feature “plastic-free” so bring your reusable water containers to get your water fill-ups!! 

Sixth Grade’s “This is the Me in We” focused on the sharing of their individual silhouettes.  Each silhouette was divided into quadrants and each of the 4 quadrants included a symbol that represented: 1). My value(s); 2) My hopes and dreams; 3) My strengths; 4) What helps me get through difficult times.

The silhouettes were amazing in bringing out out the individuality of each student. For strengths, students shared sports, picking up trash in the ocean in Grandma’s back yard, surfing with the hope of getting better, and the Chicago Bulls logo to symbolize the student’s strength of determination, just to name a few!  There was a microphone with a globe given the student's gift of oral expression and his hope to make the world a better place.

There were wonderful hopes and dreams such as having a good life, being a singer, scientist or astronaut, basketball coach.  

Who or what supports you? Family, pets, comic books, music. There was a depiction of a heart with different geometric shapes surrounding the heart symbolizing each person is different in his/her own unique way.

Values?  Peace (written in Japanese), a lion (bravery), tree for steadfastness, humor, flower (kindness).

What a very heartwarming assembly by our caring, thought-provoking children!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli's Friday Assembly with Uncle Masa!

Uncle Masa pays a visit!  He’s DA ONE!

         Uncle Masa with his daughter, Macie ('17)

Children, teachers and staff were greeted on Friday with a visit from Uncle Masa (aka Marc Miyamoto complete with waxed eyebrows and sporting a great fishing hat).  There was good fun singing songs with Uncle Masa learning about table manners and rhyming with colors:

This is the COLOR song
Come on and sing along

Even if you sing it wrong
Sing it loud and sing it strong
At the end of every line
Say the color that might rhyme
There’s a few you might not know
It gets harder as you go

 

What rhymes with door hinge?  RIGHT . . . ORANGE!  The children got it right every time!

The Color Song was followed by a fun song singing the names of all the 195 nations in the world in a tempo presto!  Zoe, Subash, and Zane courageously went to the stage and led the Assembly in singing!

It was an Assembly filled with delight!

Hanahau'oli Sixth Grade Assembly

CAMP MOKULE‘IA

It’s a grand tradition . . . the 6th graders get to start the beginning of each school year at Camp Mokule‘ia!

At assembly this morning, the 6th graders had such fun sharing their camp experiences that involved recreational and bond building games such as “Toxic Pond,” “Half Pipe” “Centipede,” “Wa‘a” and “Trust Fall,” just to name a few.

Through live demonstrations of games and video, all of us at Assembly were able to “join in the fun” and experience these interactive challenges that promote risk-taking, strategy planning, living creatively, collaborative-thinking, effective communications, trust, and cooperation.  “Saving Kumu” (teacher in Hawaiian) introduced another level of challenge.  “Kumu,” or Mrs. Varney, was symbolized by a big round beach ball that couldn’t be dropped by the students while doing the games!!

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We were challenged with the very first game entitled “All Aboard!”  On the Assembly stage was a small blue box.  The goal was to get as many friends as you can to squish together to fit on the small box without having their feet touch the ground. How is this possible?  Talk about creative problem-solving!  Piece of cake! Assembly-goers saw first-hand how our 6th grade students successfully solved this challenge! Amazing!

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The “Trust Fall” included the zipper, a series of interlocking arms of several students, paired up and facing one another, arms interlaced and outstretched in front of them.  In this position, all of them prepared to catch their classmate fall into their interlacing arms.  Spotters are assigned to ensure safety.

Spotters are you ready? 
Ready!
Student communicates “ready to fall.” 
Classmates respond “ready to catch!” 
Student falls safely into the arms of her/his classmates as s/he is bounced down the
intertwined arms.  Light as a feather!

These challenging games truly engaged students to leave their comfort zones, and personally experience and learn the importance of community-building, mutual support, and the value of friendships.

Hanahau'oli School . . . The Flag Assembly

Joyous work begins at flag!

TODAY, we talked and reflected about why flag is such an important tradition at Hanahau'oli.  Our librarian, Ms. Gabby '02, contacted her classmates and asked them what they remembered most about flag.  One friend cheerfully remembered how each school day began with "we shall now salute the flag.  Ready, begin!"  Emma Galdeira '04 reminisced how we all came together as a school with friends.  Another friend shared memories of talking, singing, sharing birthday books, walking with a partner, and having fun seeing everyone -- older and younger.  One of Ms. Gabby's classmates told a funny story of forgetting to put up the flag and once he got it, he accidentally hung it upside down!

The children at Assembly conveyed wonderful sentiments about why flag is so important . Ideas were flowing such as, "we can get together as one big 'ohana," and "it's a nice way to start the day." Mrs. Armstrong enjoyed being outside and seeing special things like the fairy terns. Cappy and Ka'oli's grandmother, Linda Strong '59 shared that they used to recite "Canticle of the Sun" written by St. Francis of Assisi at flag.  Amber '89, daughter of Linda Strong, shared that she likes flag because after a morning of rushing to get to school, it's a time to slow down and be reflective. With Cappy and Ka 'oli, this is 3 generations in one family who have special memories of flag!

Mr. Hirokawa shared 2 special thoughts of the day:

Today may beautiful things happen to you; and
Let us honor this day

Hawaiian thoughts of the day were led by Uncle Blair:

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Kūlia I ka nu'u - Strive to reach the top
Pūpu Kahi I Holomua -- Unite to move forward
Ma ka hana ka'ike - In working, one sees

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We ended Assembly singing together 3 of Mrs. Ostrem's favorite flag songs: Magic Penny, Make New Friends, and The More We Get Together!

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Hooray for flag!

 

 

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli School 99th Birthday Assembly

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Hau‘oli Lā Hānau Hanahau‘oli School!

On Monday, September 11th, Mrs. Alison Baclig with the help of the Kukunaokalā students announced the 99th birthday of Hanahau‘oli School. Children sang Happy Birthday and everyone was invited to write or draw their wishes on a large orange card posted on the Kukunaokalā board. 

At Assembly, today Kulāiwi teacher, Mrs. Kathy Galdeira, and Kukunaokalā teacher, Mrs. Alison Baclig, shared the oldest tradition of the school – the ringing of the BELL!

They led a conversation with the students of what it’s like to be 99 years old. We closed the Assembly by learning a beautiful song written by former Music teacher, Mrs. Chris Mullen, led by the Kulāiwi students, “The Hanahau‘oli Lullaby”. Ask your child to sing it to you!

Enjoy our new Hanahau'oli Lullaby sung by our entire school in this video captured by one of our Hui parents, David Yew. Mahalo, David!

Hanahau'oli Lullaby
This is our school
To cherish and love
To keep and protect
And take care of
In Makiki we gather
Together as oneBeneath the green trees
And under the sun
This is our school. . . this is our school

With the song of our bell
Our school day begins
We see smiling faces
That welcome us in
From Juniors to 6th grade
We gather each day
To wonder and learn
To work and to play
This is our school. . . this is our school.

Created by the Kulāiwi Class of 2004 with Mrs. Chris Mullen

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Hanahau'oli School Assembly

At our first school assembly of the 2017-2018 school year, Mrs. G-W asked the children if they knew what they wanted to be when they grew up and why.  Some answered, "Singer, Dancer, Author!" Mrs. G-W expressed how wonderful it is to have these dreams and that learning at Hanahau'oli School will help them to acquire the values and skills to become what ever they wish to be. She read Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty a story about a little girl who is curious about the world around her and how she will learn to figure things out. 

At our first school assembly of the 2017-2018 school year, Mrs. G-W asked the children if they knew what they wanted to be when they grew up and why.  Some answered, "Singer, Dancer, Author!" Mrs. G-W expressed how wonderful it is to have these dreams and that learning at Hanahau'oli School will help them to acquire the values and skills to become what ever they wish to be. She read Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty a story about a little girl who is curious about the world around her and how she will learn to figure things out. 

Slipper Toss

The slipper toss is a longstanding tradition here at Hanahau‘oli School where all of the students, faculty, staff, and parents toss one slipper up in the air culminating the last day of the school year. It's a fun and refreshing way to say, "mahalo!" to a great year and let's all have a safe and happy summer.

Kulaiwi Goes Voyaging

“All hands on deck!” defined Kulaiwi’s learning voyage to discover our Island Home.  With Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian Voyaging Society volunteers, and their teachers as their navigators, Kulaiwi students set sail on the Hikianalia to culminate their year-long study of the ocean, marine biology, and geology. Children excitedly embraced the opportunity to practice their voyaging skills, focusing on observing, feeling, listening, and cooperating.  Special thanks to the creators of the video: Kainoa (‘20) and Kepano Kekuewa.

2017 Stepping Stones Ceremony

Step, step, stepping stones... follow me across the stones! What a beautiful day to celebrate our 6thgraders as they revealed their stepping stones in the courtyard today. As Mr. Shin prepared to release his homing pigeons, Mrs. G-W took the opportunity to convey that as they get ready to take flight, Hanahau‘oli School will always be a home for them to return to.

“I learned how to work together in JK and how to move on in 6th Grade. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “Life is a journey, not a destination” While I am sure we will all remember this graduation day, what we really appreciate are the steps it took to get here.” - Alumna, c/o 2017