ORATORY!

The May 25th Assembly featured the 6th grade honored orators.  This recognition was based on effort, narrative writing, openness to suggestion, and delivery.  They are:

Nalani Wooten, Thalia and the Gift of Athena

Nina Chang, Hippolyta, and Orpheus and Eurydice

Geoffrey George, Nestor, and Arcus and Callisto

Eryx Awaya, Phryxius, and Jason and the Argonauts

Brody Badham, Theseus, and Echo and Narcissus

Ashly Winkler, Harmonia, Atalanta’s Race

The audience enjoyed hearing each of the honored orators share their magnetic and engaging speaking skills as they retold their stories.  Their practice and preparation were very evident.

There were also two other ways to recognize the 6thgrade Orators.  There were:

Aphetors (one who practices a lot in order to achieve what may seem to be an impossible goal.  The aphetors are:  Alex Dudgeon and Zoe Slentz

Rhapsodes are those recognized who loved and honored the spirit of the story.  The Rhapsodes are: Kea Nakayama and Ari Ito

Our mahalo to Oratory judges, Rick Crum '04 and Kyle Galdeira '97! Congratulations to the entire 6th grade class for a very special Oratory!

Spring Band Concert!

The Spring Band Concert was filled with exciting tunes at our Friday Assembly on May 4, 2018 from the school's 3 band ensembles:  Beginning Band, Concert Band and Wind Ensemble.

The Beginning Band featured  14 student performers playing the clarinet, flute, trumpet, alto sax, and percussion.  The audience had fun listening and keeping to the beat and rhythms of songs that featured the various sections of the band, playing at slow and fast tempi, and familiar tunes such as the American folk song, Go Tell Aunt Rhodie and Lightly Row.  These beginning band students were so impressive!

The Concert Band treated the audience to a medley of folk tunes from around the world!  Traditional and well known folk songs from France, Norway, Mexico, Japan, Africa, and the Caribbean were diverse in their melodies and rhythms and such fun to hear!  There were outstanding drum and bass guitar beats!  The finale, the Banana Boat Song, was a hit!  Great job to all 10 student performers!

The Wind Ensemble played Game of Thrones by Roman Djawadi and Ghosts of the Lost Ship by Tyler S. Grant!  These were robust pieces that featured all sections of the Wind Ensemble with the help of Mr. Hirokawa on sax.  There are a total of 17 student musicians in the Wind Ensemble, and even with a few of their peers being absent, the Wind Ensemble played admirably to the rousing enthusiasm of parents, friends, and family.  

This Spring Concert also honored the 7 graduating 6th graders and was an opportunity to thank them for their commitment to the band program.  We will miss them and we hope they will continue their love of music!

 

 

Stepping Stones . . . Then and Now!

As we head towards the end of the 2017-18 school year, everyone looks forward to the Stepping Stone ceremony!  It’s one of Hanahau‘oli’s earliest traditions, the first Stepping Stone Ceremony held in 1926,  and a time when we can, as a school, honor the 6th graders and look forward to excitement when they are able to unveil their stones!

Our Friday Assembly held on April 27, 2018, was a wonderful opportunity to explore the school's tradition of Stepping Stones.  Mrs. Baclig and Mrs. Galdeira read some passages in the book by Miss Palmer, Memories of Hanahau'oli.  In an article for the school magazine in 1930, there's a passage written by Frank Earle that remains true today:  "A stepping stone is one thing that everybody who goes to Hanahau'oli  leaves behind. . . . each stone is different from the next and bears the personal trademark of the maker."

We got to see archival photos of the Stepping Stone ceremony from many years ago and compare them to our ceremony today.  What was the same?   What was different?  

The Assembly had 5 invited guests -- all alumna -- Erin Palmer '69 (Neve '21), Stephanie Soll '82 Buck (Ethan '13; Aiden '20), Jodi Shin '83 Yamamoto (Sean '12, Scott '15, Spencer '19), Julie Judd '90 (Mason '23, Leila '25) and our librarian, Gabby Holt '02 (with grandmother (Hanakulani Ferreira '50; father (Daniel Holt '77;  brother (Davis Holt '04); and sister, Emily Holt '06) who came to Hanahau'oli).  

They each shared why stepping stones were so important to them.  Erin shared how the way the stones were made has changed over time.  Stephanie's stone design was a springboard diver representing what she loved to do when she was young.  She loves coming back to see her stone, her sister's stone, and Ethan's stone and how the stones connect the generations.  Jodi's stone has twirling batons in a form of a cross.  She had a passion for twirling batons that led to her love of performance and her stepping stone reminders her of how her love for performing came from Hanahau'oli. 

Julie's stepping stone has a rose because she loved gardening with her mom and still loves working in the garden today! 

Gabby shared the stepping stones of her grandmother, father, and her brother.  She thinks the stepping stone helped her with empathy, being able to identify with and understand the same stepping stone experiences as her relatives.

Mrs. Galdeira shared the news about the Kulāiwi book on Hanahau'oli traditions that is being published right now in China for the Centennial!  Phoebe Lin shared her research on stepping stones, "Our Stepping Stones tradition is really important for remembering past days . . . it's something you leave behind so other people can remember you and you can show your passion!"

 

 

Let's Play Hanahfuda . . . Hawaiian Style!

Grandparents and Kūpuna Day on April 11, 2018 was a joyful day on campus!  Students were having such fun engaged in activities with their kūpuna!  The students of Po'e Ka'ahele had a very special activity for Grandparents Day.  They learned how to play Hanafuda!  Hanafuda is a traditional Japanese card game that means "flower cards."  They learned how to play from Aunty Helen, an expert in Hanafuda from her organization Hanafuda Hawaii. . . they had so much fun they decided to create an Assembly and teach everyone how to play Hanafuda!

Aunty Helen was at assembly to share her love of playing Hanafuda.  She said her interest in Hanafuda started with her 5-year old granddaughter.  She wanted her granddaughter to learn about her Japanese heritage.  She wanted to do an intergenerational fun activity that creates an opportunity for grandparents to feel younger as they play with their grandchildren and the grandchildren can enjoy learning from their grandparents.

The traditional Hanafuda cards have Japanese plants, flower and animals.  Aunty Helen wanted to make it more relevant to Hawaii children so she designed, with the help of her artist son, a set of Hanafuda cards called Hanafuda Nā Pua Hawaii.  Hanafuda Hawaiian style features plants, flowers and animals that are endemic to Hawaii or brought over by canoe. Aunty Helen talked about the "ike" or knowledge that is acquired by playing Hanafuda, and our kuleana or responsibility to share our knowledge and Malama our earth and its resources

The Po'e students showed how to play the game, how to win points, sang a song to the tune of "One little, Two little Three Little Indians," in which the lyrics were all the plants and flowers of the Hanafuda Hawaiian deck.  It's a very game that requires strategy, math, and good observation!

 

The Hawaiian Kingdoms Assembly April 6, 2018

It was exciting to hear the children's learning about 4 kingdoms of Hawaii:  O'ahu, Maui, Kauai and the Big Island.  Beautifully-made posters and visuals accompanied their presentations that covered the island's specific color: O'ahu -- yellow and the flower 'Ilima; Maui -- pink and the Maui rose or lokelani; Kauai -- purple for the flowers found in the Mokihana tree, and the Big Island -- red from the bright red blossoms from the Ohia flowers.  The classes talked about the mountain ranges and sang Na Moku 'Eha.  

The Golden Rule -- Assembly March 16, 2018

DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD HAVE THEM DO UNTO YOU!

It begins with YOU!  

The Friday Assembly of March 16, 2018 was about one of the world's most universal rules found in cultures around the world and that has been around for thousands of years.  Anyone can practice this rule. It is a special rule that can be practiced by people young and old and by all faiths.

We were treated to the reading of the book, The Golden Rule, by Ilene Cooper and illustrated by Gagi Swaikowska, by Mrs. Shimek.   Mrs. Shimek learned about this book from Mrs. Mullen, the school's former music teacher. It is a beautiful book in which a grandfather explains to his grandson how and why the Golden Rule is so important.  The Golden Rule describes very simply how we can live with one another if you learn to treat people the way you you'd like to be treated.  

Members of the Kulāiwi class performed a meaningful skit based on the Golden Rule and  the Assembly culminated with the singing of song composed by Mrs. Mullen on the Golden Rule.

It was an Assembly that shared in meaningful ways -- through reading, through theater, and through song -- the important message for all of us to live by!  Remember, it begins with you!

 

Patty the Cat and the New Friend!

Kuikahi Assembly full of fun!

Adapted from the story by Kimberly & James Dean Pete the Cat and the New Guy, Tharie's Birthday Book was the source of inspiration for the whimsical and enjoyable Kuikahi play!

Patty the Cat meets a new friend, Agnes the Platypus!  Along the way, they meet new friends, climbing squirrels, cartwheel kitties, leaping toads, ball-playing turtles, twin dogs doing Jujitsu, Spanish and Chinese-speaking owl cousins.  Agnes gets sad because she says she can't climb, do cartwheels, leap, play ball, do Jujitsu, or speak another language.  Her friend Patty reminds her, "don't be sad, don't be blue.  There is something everyone can do."  Finally, groovy sounds are heard down the street and Agnes started rocking to her own beat!  The entire assembly audience rose to their feet dancing and joining Patty and Agnes!  Everyone was celebrating that there IS something everyone can do!

 

SORT IT OUT!

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle . . . was the slogan and catchphrase for Friday's assembly!  Performers from the Honolulu Theater for Youth came to each us all about opala and to answer the key question, "where does it go?"   Sitting on the stage were 3 trash bins and together we learned that the blue cart items are made into new products; the green cart materials are turned into mulch and compost and the gray cart items are burned to make electricity!  The performers entertained us with songs, games, and skits to educate everyone about the City's curbside recycling program.  

Need a present?  The performers had great ideas how to use old stuff and make them into new stuff!  How about taking a teddy bear, removing the stuffing and make it into a backpack!  We can save an entire forest with one hand!  How?  Simple!  Use a pair of reusable chopsticks! 

We were all made deputy sheriffs of garbage, determined to reduce, reuse and recycle and stop any outlaws in our our our family and help them SORT IT OUT!

We know where to find more information!  opala.org!

It was a fabulous morning of learning with loads of laughter on the importance of recycling.

Multiple Generations of Learning-by-Doing!

The Legacy of Hands-on Learning at Hanahau‘oli through the perspectives of 3 generations of the Ho ‘Ohana!

One of our littlest learners shared at the beginning of Friday assembly on 2/16/18 that “our school is very old!”  This was the perfect lead-in to present  Stuart Ho ’47, son Peter Ho ’77, Peter’s wife, Michelle Kondo ’84 Ho, and their children Kahn '19 and Lia '2. They were featured on the assembly stage sharing their reflections on their personal experiences of hands-on learning at Hanahau‘oli.

Stuart shared his vivid memories of learning-by-doing while he was at school in the 40’s.  He said that during the war years, he learned how to make a bed and iron a shirt because his mother was very busy with supporting war activities.  He recalls making kapa, the Lono prayer, and the bomb shelter that was built in the school yard!

Peter chimed in recalling that by the 70’s when he was at Hanahau’oli, he enjoyed jumping on the dirt in the field by the fence that had some “flex” to it.  He and a bunch of friends jumped on it and the dirt broke through and, much to their surprise, they discovered the actual bomb shelter  30 years later!  He remembers most of all the importance sense of traditions: Makahiki, making stone soup, Halloween and the Christmas programs, birthday books (he recalled specifically his birthday book when he turned 9 – Runaway Ralph!).  What Peter values most were the people who surrounded him – he remembered and named all his teachers and all those special people who "put a smile both on your face and in your heart."

Michelle had many fond memories too.  Learning-by-doing for her meant learning songs together and singing the in the Pavilion.  Our way of “holding up the words” to the songs on large easel paper remains a joyful memory.  She loved how everyone gets to know everybody on campus well, and this is something to be treasured as this doesn’t always remain as you get older.  Michelle shared her kapa made with dirt and natural dyes painted with the hala brushes that the children still do today.

Kahn said, “I remember everything!”  He eagerly shared his Kulāiwi learning trip book and Lia enjoyed making in Physical World Lab a little island with her own hands!

Throughout the decades, the Ho ‘ohana has showed us that learning-by-doing truly defines us as a school as we have lived it and breathed it since our founding! 

  

The magic of 100 -- Happy 100th Day of School

Hau'oli O Ka La
Haneli O Ke Kula
Happy 100th Day of School!

Kukunaokalā's Ka'imi Loa and Kuikahi classes happily showed us their learning of what 100 means.  What better way than to celebrate the 100th day of school!  There was math learning on 100 -- beautiful Octopus drawings with 10 tentacles, each with 10 stickers!  What about 100th Day Hero capes decorated and glittered that showed counting by 10's to 100!  Out in the courtyard were visual examples of their learning, such as what do 100 beads look like?  100 packets of sugar in a jar?  What about 100 robot stickers?  And our lovely school bell -- all 100 of them as the entire assembly audience helped to count to 99 with Hanahau'oli students each holding a numbered school bell from 1 to 99!  We stopped dramatically at 99 as Mrs. Ostrem reminded us that Hanahau'oli this year is 99 years old . . . and then we gleefully shouted "100" as Mrs. G-W held up the school bell with #100 in grand anticipation of the school's Centennial next year.

What a great introduction to the singing of 2 beautiful Centennial songs, composed by music teacher, Mr. Hirokawa, with lyrics by students and alumni.   The children really sang the songs with so much heart and the songs were preceded by Bruno Mars' lively 24K Magic with lyrics just for our school by Mr. Miyamoto!  It was so fun, so inspiring as we gear up for our Centennial celebration next school year!

Hanahau'oli Assembly by Po'e Ka'ahele

Assembly-goers were treated with not one, but two presentations from the Po'e Ka'ahele class this past Friday! First, the students presented their Historical Fiction projects then they walked us through their Big Island Trip technology projects. It was a fun mix of "old" and "new" juxtaposing the kids dressed up as historical figures for the first half of Assembly then putting on a Power Point presentation of their scientific, cultural, and environmental findings on Hawaii Island for the second!

The Kulāiwi class studies geology each year so the Po'e Ka'ahele class though it'd be great to share what they learned on their Big Island Trip in an interactive way by creating a Virtual Field Trip. 

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Each white dot on the map represents a project that the students completed about a topic pertaining to their learning. Here is an example below of a 360 degree view with learning buttons to click on. What a fun way to learn about the the cultural and geological significance at any age!

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A few of the topics included were: The Mo'okini Heiau, A'a vs. Pahoehoe Lava, Island Formation of Lō'ihi, Rainforests, Active vs. Dormant Volcanoes, and Independence (going on a trip without parents or guardians for the first time and how new that felt!).

Thank you to the Po'e Ka'ahele class for building such a fantastic learning tool for us to use for years to come!

 

 

6th Grade Social Justice Unit Assembly

This morning's Hanahau'oli Assembly was brought to us by our very own 6th Grade class! In Library Class this semester, the students studied the topic of social [in]justice with Librarian, Ms. Gabby Holt '02. Each student researched an activist then completed a keynote speech to teach others what they learned. In today's Assembly, we enjoyed excerpts from many of the keynotes as well as a collaborative reading of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech from 1964. 

The inspirational research projects brought correlation and light to the life and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in honor of the recent holiday we all enjoyed in his name.

George Helm, Maya Lin, Rosa Parks, Nelson Mandela, Helen Keller, Patsy Mink, Jane Goodall, John Lewis, Ida B. Wells, Susan B. Anthony, Harriett Tubman, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Cesar Chavez, Rachel Carson, Sophie Scholl, Julia Bonds, Dolores Huerta, Mother Jones, Malala Yousafzai, Fred Fay, Jacob Lawrence, Fred Korematsu, Frederick Douglass, the 442nd Regiment, and the Freedom Riders were among the amazing social activists the students learned about!

Ms. Gabby then ended the morning saying to each of our students, "All of the these people made the world a better place but they all started out as kids in school. I see each and every one of you being kind and smart every day and that is all you need to change the world."  

She then asked the entire Assembly, "Can you do it?"

And we all cheered, "Yes, we can!!!"

 

The Joy of Pounding Mochi! Happy New Year! Mochi Tsuki!

The January 12, 2018 Kukunaokalā Assembly re-introduced another valued tradition at Hanahau'oli -- celebrating the New Year as they do in Japan with families and friends -- pounding mochi!

Our retired, beloved Mrs. Inouye, was invited by teachers Mrs. Baclig, Mrs. Lee Loy, Mrs. Matsui, and Mrs Ostrem to return and to teach us about Hanahau'oli's celebration of Mochi Tsuki. Mrs.s Inouye shared that Mochi Tsuki has been a customary and long-held event since 1982.  It started with the Alan Goto Family (Sage '88, and Ken '91) and with the help of Mito Tamashiro, the school's Head Custodian until she retired in 1991.

For the Japanese people, New Year is the most important day of all.  It is a chance for a fresh start, when people can make changes and make new habits.  Mrs. Inouye reminded us that all happy feelings must go into the mochi as we pound, "potan, potan, yare tsuki, sora tsuki."  Potan is the sound we make when we pound mochi!  We joyfully count as we pound and make the mochi the traditional way -- with implements and steamers made of wood, working together with family and friends as a cohesive team, and sharing the delicious mochi! Yum!

After Assembly, each class had a chance to pound, to make mochi with red bean paste (tsubushi-an filled) or plain, dusted with kinako, a roasted soybean flour!  It was so fun to have moms, dads, and family join us and help us in the pounding, the making, and the tasting!

Happy new year everyone!  Doomo arigatoo gozaimashita, Sensei gata!

Hanahau'oli Camp Songs Assembly

Led by Mr. Miyamoto, Mr. Sataraka, and Mr. Hirokawa, our assembly was transported to Camp Creaky Walka, a team-bonding camp for all ages! We saw what Camp was "like" for Hanahau'oli's faculty and staff over the holiday break through a funny slideshow filled with pictures of activities like: low ropes course trust falls, volleyball, high and climbing wall obstacles, eating contest (won by Ms. Mastui!), and campfire circle and s'mores time.

It was a musical morning as we sang campfire songs with Campers, Marc and Micah such as: Bazooka Bubblegum, Boom Chicka Boom, and On Top of Spaghetti! We also learned a lot about our campers! For instance, Camper Marc wants to be a music teacher when he grows up and his favorite color is orange and Camper Micah likes tools and his favorite color is white! Thank you to Camp Creaky Walka Director, Mr. Sataraka for teaching us all how to be great campers!

Hanahau'oli Assembly Brings GREAT JOY!

During this holiday season and time for celebration, we all reflect upon things that we wish for. 

Mrs. G-W led a beautiful assembly about great wishes and joys.  She posed to our students, “What do you wish for?”  Hands quickly raised -- “A pet unicorn!”  “I wish snow could be everywhere!” “Headphones!” A car with a castle on top!” “No homework!”  “I want people to stop fighting.”  “I wish for wars to stop.”

Following the sharing by the children, Mrs. G-W read a story entitled Great Joy by Kate DiCamillo. This story inspires students to think even more about wishes.

We learn about Frances, a little girl from New York.  She will be in a holiday pageant at her church and she needs to learn her line in the play. However, her attention is elsewhere. She looks down from her window and sees an organ grinder with his monkey holding a tin cup.  The organ grinder sings songs but they sound sad and far away.

“Where do they go at night?” Frances ponders this and asks her mother.   Frances finds out that they sleep in the street, even when it snows. 

On the morning of the pageant, Frances puts a nickel in the cup and invites the organ grinder with his monkey to her church and to the pageant. 

It was time for the pageant! Frances has her opportunity to say her line but she remained silent. She was so concerned about the organ grinder and the monkey.  Suddenly, the church doors open and the organ grinder and the monkey appeared.  What GREAT JOY!

We wish all our families these special moments sharing kindness, compassion, aloha, and  GREAT JOY!  Happy holidays to all! 

HANAHAU 'OLI HOLIDAY BAND CONCERT

DECEMBER 8, 2017

Joyful Jazzy Jingles by Hanahau'oli's Beginning Band, Concert Band and Wind Ensemble were a treat at our last Friday's Assembly!

Performers from all 3 bands, led by Band Teacher, Ernie Provencher, played beautifully and delighted the audience inspiring the holiday spirit!

Beginning Band . . .  Hot Cross Buns was really hot!  First Flight really took off!  Rolling Along sure did sound like Mary Had a Little Lamb with a wonderful winter holiday spin!

Concert Band . . . your music was lively in Old MacDonald had a Band! Frères Jacques, dormez-vous?  Absolutely not!  Everyone was wide awake listening to your great sounds . . . and the tunes, When the Saints Go Marching In followed by Hard Rock Blues were swinging supported by those steady beats of the percussion players!  The audience was amazed by the beautiful flute solo of Brielle Rousseau playing Aura Lee!

Wind Ensemble . . . the musicianship of the student musicians in performing All Through the Night, Scarborough Fair, Incantation and Ritual and the Holiday Medley were clearly evident. This repertoire was fun and full of musical delights!  And what about that special saxophone player, Mr. Hirokawa joining the wind ensemble!

As Mrs. G-W said, the two best holiday concerts took place right here on campus!  How lucky we all were to hear the children play and be INSTRUMENTAL in creating such wonderful holiday spirit!

Thanks to both Mr. Uehara and Mr. Provencher for their work with the students!

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli Holiday Orchestra Concert

 

This morning, the pavilion was filled with the merriment of Christmas music!

Our Beginning Orchestra began with "Mary's Adventures" - three versions of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" followed by "Jingle Bells." A member of the Intermediate Orchestra, Ashlyn Ito, performed a cello solo playing Henry Purcell's "Rigadoon." The Intermediate Orchestra entertained with "Old Uyehara Had a Farm," naming then playing each instrument in a fun version of "Old McDonald Had a Farm." They then played "Up on the Housetop," "Can Can," and Beethoven's "Ode to Joy." The festively attired Advanced Orchestra treated listeners to a variety of pieces beginning with "La Petite Danseuse," "Rest Ye Merry, Rock Ye Very," an energized rendition of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen", and with the help of guest drummer, Mr. Harold Chang, they brought down the house with "Jingle Rock: Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas and Jingle Bell Rock" featuring Mie Kodama, Emi Okumoto, and Ashly Winkler. Thank you to Ms. Megumi Kurachi for accompanying many songs on the piano and Mr. Chad Uyehara for leading the students to another great Holiday Concert! 

Happy Holidays!!!

Hanahau'oli's 2017 Makahiki Celebration

Makahiki at Hanahau'oli is always a joyous occasion and this year was one of the best! Students from all classes performed wonderful mele (songs), hula (dances), and Hawaiian games and we even donated over 250 cans of food as ho'okupu (offerings) to a local shelter in honor of the event.

 The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The class of 2018 poses for a group picture moments before the start of Makahiki proudly wearing their kapa.

 The blowing of the    "pū",    or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the   Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the    "kapu"    system.  This festival honored the god    Lono  ,  who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

The blowing of the "pū", or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the "kapu" system.

This festival honored the god Lono, who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

 Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

 To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang  “E Ala E.”  The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “ Pua Ke Ko .” This song told us about the relationship between the " ko" , or sugarcane, and the  "he’ ʻ e" , octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang “E Ala E.” The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “Pua Ke Ko.” This song told us about the relationship between the "ko", or sugarcane, and the "he’ʻe", octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

 The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

 Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

 The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

Ancient Hawaiʻians enjoyed participating in sports that tested their strength, skill and endurance. Although war was forbidden during Makahiki, many of these sports allowed the young men and women to display their skills. The 6th Graders enjoyed showing us how these many games are played!

Makahiki continues to be one of our most cherished traditions. This year, seven 6th Grade parent alumni shared their fondest memories of their Makahiki experiences with Mrs. G-W and the crowd in honor of our 99th birthday as a school! 

 Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.

Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.

 

 

HANAHAU'OLI'S FRIDAY KAPA-MAKING ASSEMBLY!

The School’s Valued Tradition of Kapa-making for Makahiki

The Po‘e Ka‘ahele class enchanted us with their joy and excitement of making their kapa for Makahiki.  The Po‘e students enlightened us on the entire process, starting with the wauke plant, scraping the bark and pounding the slice of bark with a kapa beater to spread out the fibers making and preparing a fabric ready for printing. 

We learned about the ‘ohe kāpala.  These are stamps (originally made with bamboo) carved with primarily geometric shapes used to print the repetitive patterns onto their kapa.  The children said the stamp design was personally meaningful and symbolic to each of them. They taught us how they needed to consider the importance of  both positive and negative space in designing their kapa.

Our students used carved into linoleum glued to wood to make their ‘ohe kāpala.  Each student shared their particular designs, and informed us that originally Native Hawaiians were able to use natural dyes were extracted from every part a plant. Some students chose fish hook, mountains, sunset, erupting volcanoes, waves, land, sky, ocean for their designs. 

We also learned how the boys correctly tie and wear the kapa!

Hurry hurry and please stop by the Art Gallery and view for yourself the beauty and the craftsmanship of the Po‘e students’ kapa! The Po‘e students will proudly wear their kapa at Makahiki on Wednesday, 11/22/17!

A special mahalo to Mrs. Okano for her help with making the kapa!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!