2017 Children's Fair Logo: Student-Designed!

Returning to our school “roots” guides the Hui’s work this year, especially as we prepare for our Centennial.  Since the Fair’s beginnings in 1924, children play a special part in shaping the fair experience.  From designing signage to creating crafts to performing on stage to running games, the involvement is rich and meaningful. 

Committed to “learning by doing” and striving to seize opportunities for students to engage in authentic work, Mrs. Okano and Mrs. Woo asked the sixth grade students if they would be interested in designing the logo for this year’s Children’s Fair.  Nine students eagerly and enthusiastically embraced the challenge, dedicating several recess times to this important work.

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At each step of the process, Mrs. Okano and Mrs. Woo were amazed and inspired by the students’ creativity in expression as well as their deep understandings of our school’s core beliefs.  

The Fair’s theme, “Hanahau’oli School, Rooted in Our Hearts,” was presented to the students.  After thinking about the purpose of logos (as symbols) and studying common, powerful logos, the students individually brainstormed ideas to visually represent the theme.  Each student then presented their concept to the group.  A wonderful exchange of ideas and building upon ideas ensued, leading to the final concept:  a series of “growing” hands (JK - 6th grade) to represent our “hands-on” approach to learning, connected together by the mock orange branch woven throughout, ending with the sixth grade hand print over the heart.  The heart in the middle of the sixth grade palm holds “99,” celebrating our ninety-ninth year!  The flower blossom near the sixth grade hand symbolizes the idea of being in “full bloom” in the final year at Hanahau’oli.  All conceptualized by these nine students!      

Next up - execution of the design!  Several students facilitated the process of getting orange handprints from JK - 6th grade students, and selecting just the right print.  Sketching from our actual mock orange, one student drew the connecting branch and flower in bloom.  Another student practiced calligraphy to write the theme, and two students drew the “99” in the heart.

Testing the hand print process...

Testing the hand print process...

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All the pieces, ready to be integrated into a logo!

All the pieces, ready to be integrated into a logo!

Thanks to Mr. Miyamoto’s computer graphic design skills, the students were able to see the complete logo in various color combinations.  Utilizing what they know about colors, the students chose the final colors.  And, voila!  A student-created logo blooms!  

"Hands-on" voting of our favorite color combination

"Hands-on" voting of our favorite color combination

Seeing several of the students tell about their logo at the Hui General Membership Meeting captured the essence of this experience - children using their creativity to express their appreciation of and love for our school.  The final glorious moment is yet to come... Fair day, November 4th, when most of our community will be adorning their design!       

The final design!

The final design!

Hanahau'oli's Friday the 13th Assembly!

No such thing as bad luck on this day!  We were SO LUCKY to have had some great announcements from the Kare Kids and the Fair, and our 6th grade class enthralled us with their silhouettes!

The Kare Kids shared all the wonderful community service projects they are supporting this school year.  They include helping:

·      Waianae Canine Kokua to help homeless owners of dogs;

·      UNICEF at trick-or-treat to help people get clean water, purchase mosquito nets, and aid refugee children learn and heal;

·      Smile Train to bring smiles to children’s lives with cleft palates so please buy children-made crafts at the Fair to support this effort;

·      Hale Nani to support the elderly.  Kare Kids share their talents on site by telling jokes, doing magic, playing an instrument or doing art activities or crafts with them;

The Kare Kids truly care!  What unbelievable community support and service learning!. . . and unbelievable is the word for the wonderful handmade things that will be sold at the Children’s Fair to support Kare Kids’ projects!  Come get rubber band bracelets, charms, stickers, washi tapes, hand-painted rocks!  The Po‘e classroom is the place to be to support Kare Kids at the Fair!!  See you there!!

This year’s fair is focused on having the children drive many components of the fair!  We got to see hand sewn pillows that will be sold.  There will be a fun photo booth and we hope students and alumni will try out the new Sound Booth in the Art Gallery to share stories and memories!  This Fair will feature “plastic-free” so bring your reusable water containers to get your water fill-ups!! 

Sixth Grade’s “This is the Me in We” focused on the sharing of their individual silhouettes.  Each silhouette was divided into quadrants and each of the 4 quadrants included a symbol that represented: 1). My value(s); 2) My hopes and dreams; 3) My strengths; 4) What helps me get through difficult times.

The silhouettes were amazing in bringing out out the individuality of each student. For strengths, students shared sports, picking up trash in the ocean in Grandma’s back yard, surfing with the hope of getting better, and the Chicago Bulls logo to symbolize the student’s strength of determination, just to name a few!  There was a microphone with a globe given the student's gift of oral expression and his hope to make the world a better place.

There were wonderful hopes and dreams such as having a good life, being a singer, scientist or astronaut, basketball coach.  

Who or what supports you? Family, pets, comic books, music. There was a depiction of a heart with different geometric shapes surrounding the heart symbolizing each person is different in his/her own unique way.

Values?  Peace (written in Japanese), a lion (bravery), tree for steadfastness, humor, flower (kindness).

What a very heartwarming assembly by our caring, thought-provoking children!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli's Friday Assembly with Uncle Masa!

Uncle Masa pays a visit!  He’s DA ONE!

         Uncle Masa with his daughter, Macie ('17)

Children, teachers and staff were greeted on Friday with a visit from Uncle Masa (aka Marc Miyamoto complete with waxed eyebrows and sporting a great fishing hat).  There was good fun singing songs with Uncle Masa learning about table manners and rhyming with colors:

This is the COLOR song
Come on and sing along

Even if you sing it wrong
Sing it loud and sing it strong
At the end of every line
Say the color that might rhyme
There’s a few you might not know
It gets harder as you go

 

What rhymes with door hinge?  RIGHT . . . ORANGE!  The children got it right every time!

The Color Song was followed by a fun song singing the names of all the 195 nations in the world in a tempo presto!  Zoe, Subash, and Zane courageously went to the stage and led the Assembly in singing!

It was an Assembly filled with delight!

Hanahau'oli Sixth Grade Assembly

CAMP MOKULE‘IA

It’s a grand tradition . . . the 6th graders get to start the beginning of each school year at Camp Mokule‘ia!

At assembly this morning, the 6th graders had such fun sharing their camp experiences that involved recreational and bond building games such as “Toxic Pond,” “Half Pipe” “Centipede,” “Wa‘a” and “Trust Fall,” just to name a few.

Through live demonstrations of games and video, all of us at Assembly were able to “join in the fun” and experience these interactive challenges that promote risk-taking, strategy planning, living creatively, collaborative-thinking, effective communications, trust, and cooperation.  “Saving Kumu” (teacher in Hawaiian) introduced another level of challenge.  “Kumu,” or Mrs. Varney, was symbolized by a big round beach ball that couldn’t be dropped by the students while doing the games!!

We were challenged with the very first game entitled “All Aboard!”  On the Assembly stage was a small blue box.  The goal was to get as many friends as you can to squish together to fit on the small box without having their feet touch the ground. How is this possible?  Talk about creative problem-solving!  Piece of cake! Assembly-goers saw first-hand how our 6th grade students successfully solved this challenge! Amazing!

We were challenged with the very first game entitled “All Aboard!”  On the Assembly stage was a small blue box.  The goal was to get as many friends as you can to squish together to fit on the small box without having their feet touch the ground. How is this possible?  Talk about creative problem-solving!  Piece of cake! Assembly-goers saw first-hand how our 6th grade students successfully solved this challenge! Amazing!

We were challenged with the very first game entitled “All Aboard!”  On the Assembly stage was a small blue box.  The goal was to get as many friends as you can to squish together to fit on the small box without having their feet touch the ground. How is this possible?  Talk about creative problem-solving!  Piece of cake! Assembly-goers saw first-hand how our 6th grade students successfully solved this challenge! Amazing!

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The “Trust Fall” included the zipper, a series of interlocking arms of several students, paired up and facing one another, arms interlaced and outstretched in front of them.  In this position, all of them prepared to catch their classmate fall into their interlacing arms.  Spotters are assigned to ensure safety.

Spotters are you ready? 
Ready!
Student communicates “ready to fall.” 
Classmates respond “ready to catch!” 
Student falls safely into the arms of her/his classmates as s/he is bounced down the
intertwined arms.  Light as a feather!

These challenging games truly engaged students to leave their comfort zones, and personally experience and learn the importance of community-building, mutual support, and the value of friendships.

Hanahau'oli School . . . The Flag Assembly

Joyous work begins at flag!

TODAY, we talked and reflected about why flag is such an important tradition at Hanahau'oli.  Our librarian, Ms. Gabby '02, contacted her classmates and asked them what they remembered most about flag.  One friend cheerfully remembered how each school day began with "we shall now salute the flag.  Ready, begin!"  Emma Galdeira '04 reminisced how we all came together as a school with friends.  Another friend shared memories of talking, singing, sharing birthday books, walking with a partner, and having fun seeing everyone -- older and younger.  One of Ms. Gabby's classmates told a funny story of forgetting to put up the flag and once he got it, he accidentally hung it upside down!

The children at Assembly conveyed wonderful sentiments about why flag is so important . Ideas were flowing such as, "we can get together as one big 'ohana," and "it's a nice way to start the day." Mrs. Armstrong enjoyed being outside and seeing special things like the fairy terns. Cappy and Ka'oli's grandmother, Linda Strong '59 shared that they used to recite "Canticle of the Sun" written by St. Francis of Assisi at flag.  Amber '89, daughter of Linda Strong, shared that she likes flag because after a morning of rushing to get to school, it's a time to slow down and be reflective. With Cappy and Ka 'oli, this is 3 generations in one family who have special memories of flag!

Mr. Hirokawa shared 2 special thoughts of the day:

Today may beautiful things happen to you; and
Let us honor this day

Hawaiian thoughts of the day were led by Uncle Blair:

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Kūlia I ka nu'u - Strive to reach the top
Pūpu Kahi I Holomua -- Unite to move forward
Ma ka hana ka'ike - In working, one sees

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We ended Assembly singing together 3 of Mrs. Ostrem's favorite flag songs: Magic Penny, Make New Friends, and The More We Get Together!

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Hooray for flag!

 

 

 

 

 

Hanahau'oli School 99th Birthday Assembly

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Hau‘oli Lā Hānau Hanahau‘oli School!

On Monday, September 11th, Mrs. Alison Baclig with the help of the Kukunaokalā students announced the 99th birthday of Hanahau‘oli School. Children sang Happy Birthday and everyone was invited to write or draw their wishes on a large orange card posted on the Kukunaokalā board. 

At Assembly, today Kulāiwi teacher, Mrs. Kathy Galdeira, and Kukunaokalā teacher, Mrs. Alison Baclig, shared the oldest tradition of the school – the ringing of the BELL!

They led a conversation with the students of what it’s like to be 99 years old. We closed the Assembly by learning a beautiful song written by former Music teacher, Mrs. Chris Mullen, led by the Kulāiwi students, “The Hanahau‘oli Lullaby”. Ask your child to sing it to you!

Enjoy our new Hanahau'oli Lullaby sung by our entire school in this video captured by one of our Hui parents, David Yew. Mahalo, David!

Hanahau'oli Lullaby
This is our school
To cherish and love
To keep and protect
And take care of
In Makiki we gather
Together as oneBeneath the green trees
And under the sun
This is our school. . . this is our school

With the song of our bell
Our school day begins
We see smiling faces
That welcome us in
From Juniors to 6th grade
We gather each day
To wonder and learn
To work and to play
This is our school. . . this is our school.

Created by the Kulāiwi Class of 2004 with Mrs. Chris Mullen

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Hanahau'oli School Assembly

At our first school assembly of the 2017-2018 school year, Mrs. G-W asked the children if they knew what they wanted to be when they grew up and why.  Some answered, "Singer, Dancer, Author!" Mrs. G-W expressed how wonderful it is to have these dreams and that learning at Hanahau'oli School will help them to acquire the values and skills to become what ever they wish to be. She read Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty a story about a little girl who is curious about the world around her and how she will learn to figure things out. 

At our first school assembly of the 2017-2018 school year, Mrs. G-W asked the children if they knew what they wanted to be when they grew up and why.  Some answered, "Singer, Dancer, Author!" Mrs. G-W expressed how wonderful it is to have these dreams and that learning at Hanahau'oli School will help them to acquire the values and skills to become what ever they wish to be. She read Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty a story about a little girl who is curious about the world around her and how she will learn to figure things out. 

Slipper Toss

The slipper toss is a longstanding tradition here at Hanahau‘oli School where all of the students, faculty, staff, and parents toss one slipper up in the air culminating the last day of the school year. It's a fun and refreshing way to say, "mahalo!" to a great year and let's all have a safe and happy summer.

Kulaiwi Goes Voyaging

“All hands on deck!” defined Kulaiwi’s learning voyage to discover our Island Home.  With Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian Voyaging Society volunteers, and their teachers as their navigators, Kulaiwi students set sail on the Hikianalia to culminate their year-long study of the ocean, marine biology, and geology. Children excitedly embraced the opportunity to practice their voyaging skills, focusing on observing, feeling, listening, and cooperating.  Special thanks to the creators of the video: Kainoa (‘20) and Kepano Kekuewa.

2017 Stepping Stones Ceremony

Step, step, stepping stones... follow me across the stones! What a beautiful day to celebrate our 6thgraders as they revealed their stepping stones in the courtyard today. As Mr. Shin prepared to release his homing pigeons, Mrs. G-W took the opportunity to convey that as they get ready to take flight, Hanahau‘oli School will always be a home for them to return to.

“I learned how to work together in JK and how to move on in 6th Grade. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “Life is a journey, not a destination” While I am sure we will all remember this graduation day, what we really appreciate are the steps it took to get here.” - Alumna, c/o 2017