Hanahau'oli's 2017 Makahiki Celebration

Makahiki at Hanahau'oli is always a joyous occasion and this year was one of the best! Students from all classes performed wonderful mele (songs), hula (dances), and Hawaiian games and we even donated over 250 cans of food as ho'okupu (offerings) to a local shelter in honor of the event.

The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The 6th Grade class represented Hawaiian royalty beautifully and set the stage perfectly for a day of honoring Makahiki traditions as well as having some good fun along the way!

The class of 2018 poses for a group picture moments before the start of Makahiki proudly wearing their kapa.

The blowing of the "pū", or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the "kapu" system. This festival honored the god Lono, who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

The blowing of the "pū", or conch shell, signaled the beginning of the Makahiki Celebrations. This is a four-month time of rest from the Ancient Hawaiʻians’ hard life under the "kapu" system.

This festival honored the god Lono, who was the god of peace, agriculture, abundance and all of nature that nurtured the crops and food plants of the Ancient Hawaiʻians.

Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

Our youngest students, the JK class, shared “Pīʻāpā”, or the Hawaiian alphabet. The Hawaiian language was adapted into a written language in 1822. This song helps you learn all 16 letters of the Hawaiian alphabet.

To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang “E Ala E.” The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “Pua Ke Ko.” This song told us about the relationship between the "ko", or sugarcane, and the "he’ʻe", octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

To thank the sun for everything that it helps us do, the keiki from Kukunaokalā sang “E Ala E.” The class name of “Kukunaokalā” means “rays of the sun”, so it made sense that they would sing a song about the sun. They also sang “Pua Ke Ko.” This song told us about the relationship between the "ko", or sugarcane, and the "he’ʻe", octopus. When the ko tassels blossom, it is time to catch the heʻe.

The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

The Kulaiwi ‘ohana sang and danced to “Kawika”, written in honor of King Kalakaua, or “David” which is his Western name. It talks about the greatness and royalty of the last king of Hawaii.

Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

Hālau Hula O Hanahau'oli performed a lovely rendition of "Mālama Honua" with Kapena accompanying live. This was to honor the world wide voyage of the Hōkūleʻa. Their costumes depicted the constellations which are a vital component of Polynesian way finding.

The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

The students of Poʻe Kaʻahele shared the chant, "Ulei i Pahu i Ta Motu". The chant is a prophecy given by a Kaua‘i priest who foresaw the coming of Captain James Cook and the changes that would come to Hawaiʻi. The song speaks about steering your boat through rapid currents, just like Hawaiʻians steered through the many changes to their way of life.

Ancient Hawaiʻians enjoyed participating in sports that tested their strength, skill and endurance. Although war was forbidden during Makahiki, many of these sports allowed the young men and women to display their skills. The 6th Graders enjoyed showing us how these many games are played!

Makahiki continues to be one of our most cherished traditions. This year, seven 6th Grade parent alumni shared their fondest memories of their Makahiki experiences with Mrs. G-W and the crowd in honor of our 99th birthday as a school! 

Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.

Alumna, Possie Dudgeon '80 Badham, Jojo Watumull '75, and Michelle Loden '86 Slentz shared their kapa they made as students at Hanahauʻoli.